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Birmingham, Alabama 35203
Telephone: (205) 321-9600






Standing up for You


FAQS & Helpful Resources







What do you do if?

What do you do if you're in an automobile collision that's not your fault?
  • Exchange insurance information with the other driver.
  • Tell the investigating officer what happened.
  • DON'T tell the officer "I'm OK."
  • DON'T tell the other driver or anybody else standing nearby "I'm OK."
  • Contact your insurance agent and tell him/her what happened.
    • This is particularly important if you were seriously injured, requiring a lot of medical treatment or if the other driver did not have insurance.

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    What do you do if you're involved in an automobile wreck that's your fault?

    • Exchange insurance information with the other driver.
    • Tell the investigating officer what happened.
    • Contact your insurance agent and tell him/her what happened.
      • Your insurance company not only has a duty to indemnify you (pay the claim up to the amount of the policy limits)
      • but it also has a duty to defend you (hire and pay for a defense lawyer for you if the other person sues you because of their injuries).

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      What do you do if you're injured on the job?

      • Tell your supervisor/boss immediately or as soon as possible.
      • Ask you supervisor/boss what doctor he/she wants you to go to.
      • If the doctor returns you to work and you can do it without causing more pain or injury -- go back to work.
      • If the doctor returns you to work and you can't do it without causing more pain or injury-- call a lawyer who knows workers compensation law.
      • If you don't think the doctor is doing a good job treating your injuries -- call a lawyer who knows workers compensation law.
      • If you don't think the doctor cares about you -- call a lawyer who knows workers compensation law.
      • If you are able to return to work, be careful to follow all workplace rules and procedures
      • Some -- though by no means all -- employers are notorious for beginning a campaign of disciplinary actions against injured employees as an excuse to fire the employee without violating the Workers Compensation Act, which is supposed to protect injured employees from being fired for making a workers compensation claim.

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      What do you do if you're fired after getting injured on the job?



      Did You Know?

      • If an insurance adjuster calls and asks you to describe a car wreck you were recently involved in, he's asking you to give a "statement"
      • Any statement you give will be tape-recorded and can and will be used against you in court
      • When an insurance adjuster asks "are you ok?" he doesn't care nearly as much how you're actually feeling as he cares about limiting your claims for physical injury, pain and suffering
      • When an adjuster asks you questions about your wreck, he's following a carefully written script designed to trap you with your own words and limit your claims
      • Automobile insurance companies have a team of lawyers and trained claims adjusters working to protect their profit margin and reduce the value of your claim?  Shouldn't you have a lawyer working on your side, too
      • Often, you won't know how badly you were injured in a car wreck until days, weeks, or even months later
      • When ligaments, tendons, nerves and muscles are torn, bruised or strained -- what's often known as "whiplash" -- the effects frequently take a long time to show up and a long time to heal -- often far longer than broken bones.
      • The insurance industry calls these "soft tissue" injuries and treats them as far less serious (and worth far less) than broken bones -- even though they often hurt just as much or more than broken bones.
      • Most sales contracts for the purchase of an automobile, mobile home or pest control services (especially termite bonds) have an arbitration clause
      • If you sign a sales contract with an arbitration clause, you will probably lose your right to a jury trial even if you later find out that the seller has deliberately defrauded you
      • Most sales contracts for the purchase of an automobile or a mobile home have "as-is" clauses
      • If you sign a contract with an "as-is" clause, you will probably lose your right to sue if you later find that the car was wrecked or defective, even if the salesman swore that it had never been wrecked and was in "perfect shape"
      • Many sales contracts for the purchase of an automobile or a mobile home have clauses that limit your claims to, at most, getting back the money you paid for the product, without any chance of punitive damages or compensation for the time and hassle the fraud has cost you

      • Did you know that Alabama is a "right to work" state?  (Also known as "employment-at-will.") That means an employer can fire you at any ime, for any reason (or no reason at all).

        The only exceptions are:

        • you can't be fired because of race or ethnicity, gender, age or disability
        • you can't be fired because you made a workers compensation claim

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